Utilize este identificador para referenciar este registo: http://hdl.handle.net/10451/9702
Título: Apathy in acute stroke and apathetic personality disturbance secondary to stroke
Autor: Caeiro, Lara Isabel Pires de Melo, 1972-
Orientador: Ferro, José Manuel, 1951-
Figueira, Maria Luísa, 1944-
Palavras-chave: Teses de doutoramento - 2013
Data de Defesa: 2013
Resumo: In this thesis we investigated apathy secondary to stroke, both in acute and in post-acute phases. We aimed at studying apathy at 1-year after stroke and its relationship with apathy in acute stroke, demographic, pre-stroke predisposing conditions and clinical features (stroke type and location), post-stroke depression and cognitive impairment, functional outcome, and Quality of Life and Health. Apathy is a disturbance of motivation evidenced by low initiative, difficulties in starting, sustaining or finishing any goal-directed activity, low self-activation or self-initiated behaviour and/or emotional indifference. Caregivers often describe patients as presenting loss of initiative, emotional indifference and unconcern, which only became apparent after stroke. This disturbance is defined by the DSM-IV-TR clinical criteria as Personality Change Due to Stroke-Apathetic Type. Apathy may be mistaken as depression or as a detachment on caregivers to whom patients were emotionally attached previously. This state is not seen by the patient as a reason to complain to relatives or doctors, and patients accepted this new way of living and often do not report as problematic. To start our research on post-stroke apathy we performed a systematic review to better estimate its rate and relationship with associated factors, as well as to explore if apathy is associated with a poorer clinical outcome (Chapter 3: Apathy secondary to stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis). A total of 19 different stroke samples were included for analysis. The frequency of apathetic patients ranged between 15.2 to 71.1%. Pooled rate of apathy secondary to stroke was 36.3% (95%CI 30.3 to 42.8%). In the acute phase the rate of apathy was 39.5%, and in the post-acute phase the rate was 34.3%. Apathy rate was significantly higher in any-stroke (first-ever or recurrence of stroke) studies (41.6%; I2=44.9%) compared with studies including only first-ever strokes. Apathetic patients are about 3 years older than non-apathetic patients. Apathy was a common condition in older persons and in particular in older cognitively impaired people and stroke is a risk factor for apathy in both. The rate of “pure” apathy (without concomitant depression) was twice as frequent as the rate of “pure” depression (without concomitant apathy). These two neuropsychiatric disturbances were not associated, in spite of the concomitance of both in one third of the samples of stroke patients. Apathetic patients were more frequently and severely depressed in comparison to non-apathetic patients. The rate of apathy secondary to stroke was similar for left and right-sided hemispheric stroke lesions and for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke type. Finally, apathy secondary to stroke had a negative impact on clinical global outcome only if apathetic patients were first-ever stroke and were younger. The apparent discrepancy of our finding may be related to characteristics of apathy itself because apathetic patients may be less aware or report fewer complains about a loss of functionality. It also can be due to the fact that not all the original studies present a relationship between apathy and the factors. We performed a preliminary study aiming at describing the metric properties of the clinical-rated (AES-C) and self-rated (AES-S) versions of the Apathy Evaluation Scale (Chapter 4: Metric properties of the Portuguese version of the Apathy Evaluation Scale). This study was the baseline for the achievement of the other five goals proposed (Chapter 5: Post-Stroke apathy: An Exploratory longitudinal study), which depended on this one. The AES-C and the AES-S are validated for English language. The Apathy Evaluation Scale is useful to characterize and quantify apathy. We included 156 “healthy participants”, 40 healthy “elderly participants”, 21 patients with dementia, and 21 patients with depression, comprising a sample of 238 individuals. The AES-C (Cronbach α=.82; Split-half=.67) and the AES-S (Cronbach α=.81; Split-half=.60) showed good construct validity and high internal consistency. The items that loaded onto the analysis of principal components for the AES-C and AES-S were quite similar. The cut-off point of AES-C was dependent on the educational level (0-4 years of education= 38; 5-9 years=37; ≥10 years=30). The cut-off point of the AES-S was 39 points. The comparison among the four samples revealed that patients with dementia had higher scores in the AES-C. For the AES-S healthy participants scored themselves with the lowest mean scores. The Portuguese versions of the AES-C and of the AES-S were reliable and valid instruments to measure apathy in Portuguese speaking individuals. The first goal of our principal study aimed at describing the frequencies of post-stroke apathy at 1-year after stroke. Additionally, we aimed at finding out, which was the relationship between apathy in acute stroke and post-stroke apathy. (Chapter 5: Post-Stroke Apathy: An Exploratory Longitudinal Study). In the study on post-stroke clinical-rated apathy we identified 22.4% in acute stroke phase and 23.7% of post-stroke apathy at 1-year follow-up. In our multivariate model apathy in acute stroke (OR=3.8) was an independent factor for post-stroke apathy at 1-year follow-up. Apathy in acute stroke was a predictor of 41% of post-stroke apathy; two-fifths of the patients with acute apathy may still be apathetic at 1-year follow-up. We found that apathy in acute stroke increased the risk of post-stroke apathy in almost four-time fold. Nevertheless, 61% of the post-stroke apathy cases were identified at follow-up, which highlights for the importance of the evaluation of apathy at follow-up. The second goal aimed at analysing the relationship between post-stroke apathy and a specific acute stroke location (Chapter 5: Post-Stroke apathy: An Exploratory longitudinal study). No associations were found between post-stroke apathy and stroke location, but we found a trend of an association with hemispheric stroke location. Lesions in the cerebellum or at the brainstem are not involved in motivation disturbances and were not related to post-stroke apathy. In our systematic review there was no sufficient data to support conclusions, however one fact became apparent that older patients presenting left-sided stroke lesions had a significant higher rate of apathy (either acute or post-acute). The third goal of our principal study had the purpose to analyse the relationship between post-stroke apathy and post-stroke cognitive impairment (Chapter 5: Post-Stroke apathy: An Exploratory longitudinal study). We found that, at 1-year follow-up, post-stroke verbal abstract reasoning impairment was an independent risk factor for post-stroke apathy, increasing the risk of post-stroke apathy by seven-time fold. Apathetic patient’s thinking relies on a non-abstract process but instead on a concrete dimension. Abstract reasoning ability is an important prerequisite for the use of prior learning in new contexts or to the way in which prior learning affects new learning and performance. The improvement of abstract reasoning is important for patients who, due to brain lesion, have difficulties in their daily living activities. The fourth goal of our study aimed at making the analysis of the relationship between post-stroke apathy and post-stroke depression (Chapter 5: Post-Stroke apathy: An Exploratory longitudinal study). In our sample post-stroke apathy and depression were present in a quarter of our patients, but in three quarters the two clinical neuropsychiatric disturbances were independent one from the other. In our systematic review (Chapter 3: Apathy secondary to stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis) apathetic patients were more severely depressed mostly in the acute phase of stroke and for younger patients. The fifth goal aimed at analysing the relationship between post-stroke apathy and late outcome (Chapter 5: Post-Stroke apathy: An Exploratory longitudinal study). We found a relationship between post-stroke apathy and bad functional outcome. Nevertheless, apathetic post-stroke patients did not report a loss in quality of life or in self-perception of health, when compared with non-apathetic post-stroke patients. In our systematic review (Chapter 3: Apathy secondary to stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis) we did not confirm that apathetic patients had worse clinical global outcome, however there is a trend for patients with first-ever stroke and younger patients present poorer clinical global outcome.
Nesta tese investigámos a apatia secundária ao Acidente Vascular Cerebral (AVC), tanto durante a fase aguda como na fase pós-aguda do AVC (após AVC). Tivemos como objetivo o estudo da apatia ao 1º ano após o AVC e a relação desta com a presença de apatia na fase aguda do AVC, fatores demográficos, condições predisponentes prévias ao AVC e variáveis clínicas (tipo e localização do AVC), depressão e defeito cognitivo após AVC, estado funcional e Qualidade de Vida e perceção de saúde. A apatia é um distúrbio da motivação que se evidencia por baixa da capacidade de iniciativa, por dificuldades em iniciar, suster e finalizar uma atividade dirigida a um objetivo, por uma auto-ativação ou comportamento auto-iniciado baixo e/ou indiferença emocional. Os cuidadores frequentemente descrevem os seus pacientes como apresentando perda da iniciativa, indiferença emocional e despreocupação, apenas observáveis após o AVC. Esta perturbação pode ser clinicamente definida no DSM-IV-TR como uma Perturbação da Personalidade secundária ao AVC – Tipo Apático. A apatia pode ser confundida com depressão ou desapego aos cuidadores, aos quais o paciente esteve emocionalmente ligado. Este estado não é visto ou sentido pelo paciente como um estado que requeira preocupação e consequentemente como algo de que se queixar ao seu médico ou aos seus familiares. Os pacientes frequentemente aceitam esta nova forma de estar ou de viver e não a reportam como algo problemático. Para iniciar a nossa investigação sobre a apatia após o AVC fizemos uma revisão sistemática e recorremos à meta-análise. Pretendemos estimar a frequência da apatia secundária ao AVC e a relação desta com fatores associados, bem como explorar se a apatia estaria associada a um mau prognóstico clínico (Capítulo 3: Apathy secondary to stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis). No total foram incluídas na análise sistemática 19 amostras de pacientes com AVC. A frequência de pacientes apáticos variou entre 15.2 e 71.1%. O global das frequências de apatia secundária ao AVC foi de 36.3% (IC 95% 30.3 a 42.8%). Especificamente na fase aguda do AVC a frequência de apatia foi de 39.5% e na fase após AVC a frequência foi de 34.3%. A frequência de apatia foi significativamente maior nos estudos que incluíam qualquer tipo de pacientes (incluindo 1º AVC e recorrência de AVC) (41.6%; I2=44.9%) comparativamente aos estudos incluindo apenas pacientes com 1º AVC. Os pacientes apáticos eram cerca de 3 anos mais velhos que os pacientes não apáticos. A apatia era uma condição comum em pacientes mais velhos e, em particular, em pacientes mais velhos com defeito cognitivo. O AVC é um fator de risco para o surgimento de apatia em qualquer destes. A frequência de apatia “pura” (sem depressão concomitante) foi o dobro da frequência de depressão “pura” (sem apatia concomitante). Estes dois distúrbios neuropsicológicos não estavam associados, apesar de cerca de um terço das amostras de pacientes com AVC apresentar ambos. Os pacientes apáticos eram mais frequente e severamente depressivos comparativamente aos pacientes não apáticos. A frequência de apatia secundária ao AVC foi similar em doentes com AVC do hemisfério direito e esquerdo, bem como para pacientes com AVC isquémico ou hemorrágico. Finalmente, a apatia secundária ao AVC teve um impacto negativo no estado clínico global final apenas em pacientes com 1º AVC e em pacientes mais jovens. A aparente discrepância entre os nossos dados obtidos através da meta-análise e os estudos originais pode estar relacionada com as características da própria apatia, porque os doentes apáticos podem reconhecer menos frequentemente e queixarem-se menos da perda da sua funcionalidade. Também pode dever-se ao facto de nem todos os estudos constatarem uma relação entre a apatia e os fatores estudados. Realizámos também um estudo preliminar que teve como objetivo descrever as propriedades métricas das versões clinica (AES-C) e de auto-avaliação (AES-S) da Escala de Avaliação da Apatia (Capítulo 4: Metric properties of the Portuguese version of the Apathy Evaluation Scale). Este objetivo foi o ponto de partida para atingirmos os outros cinco objetivos a que nos propusemos no estudo principal (Capítulo 5: Post-Stroke apathy: An Exploratory longitudinal study), os quais estavam dependentes deste. A AES-C e a AES-S estão validadas na versão original inglesa. A AES é utilizada para caracterizar e quantificar a apatia. Estudámos uma amostra de 156 “participantes saudáveis”, 40 “participantes idosos saudáveis” de um centro de dia, 21 pacientes com demência e 21 pacientes com depressão, perfazendo uma amostra total de 238 indivíduos. Estudámos o nível de fidelidade através do Alpha (α) de Cronbach e do método Split-half, bem como a validade de constructo através da análise dos componentes principais com rotação de Varimax. Na sua versão Portuguesa, tanto a AES-C (Cronbach α=.82; Split-half=.67) como a AES-S (Cronbach α=.81; Split-half=.60) apresentaram boa validade de constructo e uma boa consistência interna. Os itens incluídos na análise de principais componentes da AES-C e AES-S eram similares. O ponto de corte da AES-C esteve dependente do nível de educação (0-4 anos de educação= 38 pontos; 5-9 anos=37 pontos; ≥10 anos=30 pontos) e o ponto de corte da AES-S foi de 39 pontos. A comparação entre as quatro amostras revelou que os pacientes com demência apresentaram pontuações mais altas na AES-C. Relativamente à AES-S, os participantes saudáveis apresentaram as pontuações mais baixas. As versões portuguesas da AES-C e da AES-S mostraram ser instrumentos válidos para medir a apatia em sujeitos portugueses. O nosso estudo principal teve como primeiro objetivo descrever as frequências da apatia 1 ano após AVC. Adicionalmente, tivemos como objetivo descobrir qual a relação entre a apatia na fase aguda e a apatia após AVC (Capitulo 5: Post-Stroke Apathy: An Exploratory Longitudinal Study). Neste estudo, a apatia avaliada clinicamente foi identificada em 22.4% dos pacientes na fase aguda e em 23.7% na fase após AVC. No modelo estatístico multivariado, a apatia na fase aguda (OR=3.8) foi um fator independente para a apatia após AVC. A apatia na fase aguda foi um preditor de 41% dos casos de apatia após AVC; ou seja, dois quintos dos pacientes com apatia na fase aguda permaneceram apáticos ao 1 ano após AVC. Descobrimos que a apatia na fase aguda do AVC quase quadruplicava o risco de apatia após AVC. Não obstante, 61% dos casos com apatia após AVC foram apenas identificados durante o seguimento, o que denota a importância da avaliação da apatia nas consultas de seguimento. O segundo objetivo teve como propósito analisar a relação entre a apatia após AVC e uma lesão aguda específica originada pelo AVC (Capítulo 5: Post-Stroke apathy: An Exploratory longitudinal study). Não se encontraram associações entre a apatia após AVC e a localização da lesão em fase aguda do AVC. No entanto, encontrou-se uma tendência associativa relativamente à localização hemisférica da lesão. As lesões do cerebelo e do tronco não estavam envolvidas nos distúrbios da motivação nem estavam relacionadas com a apatia após AVC. Na revisão sistemática que realizámos não houve dados suficientes que permitissem suportar qualquer conclusão; contudo, realçou o facto de os pacientes mais velhos e com lesões lateralizadas à esquerda apresentarem frequências de apatia mais elevadas (tanto na fase aguda como após AVC). O terceiro objetivo do nosso estudo principal pretendia analisar a relação entre a apatia após AVC e o defeito cognitivo após AVC (Capítulo 5: Post-Stroke apathy: An Exploratory longitudinal study). Após 1 ano de seguimento, o défice do raciocínio abstrato verbal foi identificado como sendo um fator de risco independente para a apatia após AVC, incrementando o risco de apatia após AVC em sete vezes. O raciocínio dos pacientes apáticos baseia-se não num pensamento abstrato mas sim num pensamento concreto. A capacidade de raciocínio abstrato é um pré-requisito importante para que o sujeito utilize a aprendizagem prévia em novos contextos ou para que essa aprendizagem afete as novas aprendizagens e as novas realizações. A possibilidade de recuperar o raciocínio abstrato é importante para os pacientes que, devido a uma lesão cerebral, têm dificuldades nas atividades de vida diária. O quarto objetivo do nosso estudo principal tinha como propósito analisar a relação entre a apatia após AVC e a depressão após AVC (Capítulo 5: Post-Stroke apathy: An Exploratory longitudinal study). Na nossa amostra, a apatia após AVC e a depressão estavam presentes em um quarto dos pacientes com AVC. No entanto, em três quartos do grupo de pacientes os dois distúrbios neuropsiquiátricos eram independentes um do outro. Na nossa revisão sistemática (Capítulo 3: Apathy secondary to stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis) os pacientes apáticos estavam mais severamente deprimidos, particularmente na fase aguda do AVC e os pacientes mais novos. O quinto objetivo do nosso estudo pretendeu analisar a relação entre a apatia após AVC e a funcionalidade clínica (Capítulo 5: Post-Stroke apathy: An Exploratory longitudinal study). No nosso estudo encontrámos uma relação entra a apatia após AVC e uma má funcionalidade. Contudo, os pacientes apresentando apatia após AVC não revelaram ter perdido nem Qualidade de Vida nem saúde em comparação com pacientes sem apatia. Na nossa revisão sistemática (Capítulo 3: Apathy secondary to stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis) não confirmámos que os pacientes apáticos apresentassem pior funcionalidade clínica. No entanto, identificámos uma tendência de associação entre a perda de funcionalidade clínica e o facto de serem pacientes com primeiro AVC ou pacientes mais novos.
Descrição: Tese de doutoramento, Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (Desenvolvimento Social e Humano), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina, 2013
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10451/9702
Aparece nas colecções:FM - Teses de Doutoramento

Ficheiros deste registo:
Ficheiro Descrição TamanhoFormato 
ulsd066982_td_Lara_Caeiro.pdf4,37 MBAdobe PDFVer/Abrir


FacebookTwitterDeliciousLinkedInDiggGoogle BookmarksMySpace
Formato BibTex MendeleyEndnote Degois 

Todos os registos no repositório estão protegidos por leis de copyright, com todos os direitos reservados.